Marsh and Farnam Gardens

Tree ID: 83
Date of tree entry: February 7, 2018
The Japanese red-cedar, otherwise called the "Japanese sugi pine" - known to the Japanese as Sugi - is a large evergreen tree which is native to Japan, can reach up to 70 m in height, and can reach trunk diameters of 4m. It serves as the national tree of Japan and is often planted around...
Image of Q. dentata in the winter, leaves attached.
Tree ID: 79
Date of tree entry: February 6, 2018
Observational details: The Korean oak was found amidst a construction site with a torn branch. It stood surveying the area as the last tree standing. Biological background: Quercus dentata is also known as the Korean oak, daimyo oak, or the Japanese emperor oak. The Korean oak is a deciduous...
Tree ID: 89
Date of tree entry: February 6, 2018
small, deciduous tree
Tree ID: 78
Date of tree entry: February 6, 2018
Hello! We're glad you've come to meet a good friend of ours, Magnolia grandifloria, "the Southern Magnolia", or as we have affectionately named her, Maggie Magnolia. Of course "her" is a misnomer since Maggie has perfect flowers, but read our section on reporductive...
Tree ID: 80
Date of tree entry: February 6, 2018
Pignut hickory (Carya glabra) is a common but not abundant species in the oak-hickory forest association in Eastern United States. Other common names are pignut, sweet pignut, coast pignut hickory, smoothbark hickory, swamp hickory, and broom hickory. The pear-shaped nut ripens in September and...
Black locust tree at Marsh Botanical Garden
Tree ID: 81
Date of tree entry: February 6, 2018
The black locust is native to United States, although it has been planted all over North America, Europe, Asia, and South Africa. The species, Robinia pseudoacacia, is a deciduous angiosperm that is considered by many to be an invasive species. The wood of the black locust is very durable and used...
Tree ID: 77
Date of tree entry: April 23, 2017
The Himalayan Pine is a beautiful tree native to the Himalayas, Karakoram, and Hindu Kush mountains. It is a coniferous evergreen that grows in altitudes of ~2000-4000 meters. The tree can grow up to 50 meters in height, but is more often 10 to 30 meters tall. It grows quickly and can thrive in...
Tree ID: 74
Date of tree entry: April 23, 2017
This tree, also known as “cigar tree” for it’s cigar-shaped, cylindrical seed pods, is located up Prospect Street behind the Marsh Botanical Garden. It is most commonly called the Southern catalpa, since it it is native to a small group of southern states. This medium-sized, deciduous tree...
Tree ID: 76
Date of tree entry: February 23, 2017
The Pawpaw, otherwise known as the Asimina triloba, is a small tree that bears the largest edible fruit in its native United States. Located close to Hillside Place, the Pawpaw stands (somewhat) tall in the Marsh Botanical Gardens. The Papaw is deciduous and growns as far south as northern Florida...
Tree ID: 75
Date of tree entry: February 9, 2017
The Amur Cork Tree, named for its corky inner bark, is an interesting specimen. The Ainu people in Japan used parts of this tree, which they call shikerebe-ni, as a painkiller. It is also a widely-used source of huàng bà, an important herb used in traditional Chinese medicine. However, in the...

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