Marsh and Farnam Gardens

Tree ID: 14
Date of tree entry: April 18, 2014
The Japanese falsecypress, also commonly known as the sawara falsecypress, is a medium to large-sized conifer. The tree is native to Japan but its planting potential has a widespread distribution across North America. The origin of its genus name "Chamaecyparis" is from the Greek words...
Tree ID: 13
Date of tree entry: April 18, 2014
The weeping beech is a variety of European beech developed in England in 1836 and first introduced to the States in 1847. This particular weeping beech drapes its branches over the gentle slope of Farnam Gardens on Prospect Street. It’s hard to miss—gnarled roots emerging around the trunk and...
Tree ID: 10
Date of tree entry: April 18, 2014
Decaisnea fargesii is commonly known as dead man's fingers or the blue bean tree. This shrub is native to western China and other western Asia countries such as Nepal, Bhutan, and northeastern parts of India, though its common names originate from Ireland. This shrub is often as wide as it is...
Tree ID: 12
Date of tree entry: February 11, 2014
The white fringe tree, Chionanthus virginicus, is a small but beautiful tree found in the Marsh Gardens. This tree is characterized by its resplendent white flowers, which bloom in May or June. The tree also has small olive-like fruit, which develops in August or September. It is deciduous and...
Tree ID: 15
Date of tree entry: April 16, 2014
Despite its name, this magnificent tree hails originally from China, but was likely planted around early Japanese Buddhist temples. It proudly overlooks the Yale Farm, and its spreading canopy provides a lovely patch of shade in the summer for student farm interns to eat lunch and nap under. It is...
Tree ID: 5
Date of tree entry: April 12, 2014
This yellowwood tree is found on the hill leading down to Marsh Botanical Gardens. Yellowwood is a medium sized (about 30 to 50 feet tall) tree that is native to North America. The tree is famous for its beautiful white flowers in late spring, early summer and yellow foliages in the fall. However...
Tree ID: 8
Date of tree entry: March 23, 2014
A rare find, this epaulette tree (Pterostyrax hispida) is the only one of its kind on the Yale Campus. The genus name refers to its fruits, "pteron" meaning "wing" and "styrax" refering to the ribbed fruit. The species name, "hispidus", references the fruit...
Tree ID: 7
Date of tree entry: March 21, 2014
The is Metasequoia glyptostroboides a rather tall standing around 66ft 5in though are still smaller than their larger redwood cousins (Sequoiadendron giganteum) on the west coast. For a while these trees were thought tho be extinct, as they had previously only been seen in the fossil record.
Tree ID: 3
Date of tree entry: March 17, 2014
This tree is a short, hardy, shrub-like tree native to Northern China and the Korean Peninsula that can be found near the short chain-link fence in the Marsh Gardens. It has corkscrew-like branches that are barbed and is also referred to as the Chinese bitter orange. This tree blooms in the...
Tree ID: 6
Date of tree entry: February 20, 2014
Located near Marsh Botanic Gardens, this fine specimen of a tree is a rewarding sight to the brave souls who trek up Prospect Street. Commonly known as rowan trees, American mountain ash are popular ornamentals in gardens and are widely used as street trees. In the spring and summer months they...

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